Skip to content. | Skip to navigation

Navigation

Carbon Smart List

by Rose Hessmiller last modified Jan 10, 2013 09:00 AM
Carbon Off Set and Carbon Sequestration
File Presentation - Ecosystem connections across seascapes in the context of services by LiLing Choo — last modified Jan 10, 2013 12:51 PM
Presentation by Peter Mumby, University of Queensland, given at the Marine Katoomba Meeting - Katoomba XVI: Building a Blueprint to Harness New Investment for the Protection of Marine and Coastal Ecosystem Services, February 9-10, 2010 held at the Moore Foundation in Palo Alto, CA. Presentation describes ecosystem connections across seascapes through the context of services.
File Presentation - Integrating Green and Blue Carbon Management: How to make it work by LiLing Choo — last modified Jan 10, 2013 12:51 PM
Presentation by Jörg Seifert-Granzin, the Katoomba Group, given at the Marine Katoomba Meeting - Katoomba XVI: Building a Blueprint to Harness New Investment for the Protection of Marine and Coastal Ecosystem Services, February 9-10, 2010 held at the Moore Foundation in Palo Alto, CA. Presentation reviews how to integrate green and blue carbon management and how to make it effective.
File Presentation - Introduction on Payments for Environmental Services in the Biodiversity Law by LiLing Choo — last modified Jan 10, 2013 12:51 PM
Presentation by Huynh Thi Mai, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment, Vietnam, given at the Marine Katoomba Meeting - Katommba XVI: Building a Blueprint to Harness New Investment for the Protection of Marine and Coastal Ecosystem Services, February 9-10, 2010 held at the Moore Foundation in Palo Alto, CA. Presentation reviews the biodiversity law structure, regulations on PES and CDB, PES potential in Vietnam, ongoing PES activities in Vietnam and the challenges of PES.
File Paying Poseidon: Financing the Protection of Valuable Ecosystem Services by LiLing Choo — last modified Jan 10, 2013 12:51 PM
Ecosystem Marketplace Market Insight Booklet, compiled by Forest Trends and the Katoomba Group, describing the importance of financing the protection of valuable ecosystem services, specifically the role the ocean plays. The publication demonstrates the need to recognize the economic value of the ocean and combining marine biodiversity offsets with marine and coastal developments. hese articles were commissioned by Ecosystem Marketplace to serve as context and provide background for the Marine Katoomba Meeting, held in Palo Alto, California, on February 9–10, 2010.
File Payments for Ecosystem Services & Environmental Markets: Training Modules by LiLing Choo — last modified Jan 10, 2013 12:51 PM
A manual produced by Forest Trends and the Katoomba Group to provide capacity building materials for specific audiences regarding payments for ecosystem services and environmental markets. This manual outlines training modules for specific audiences with subject matter and learning objectives specific to that audience; public sector, private sector, public and non-profit sector, and rural communities.
File Payments for Ecosystem Services: Getting Started in Marine and Coastal Ecosystems - A Primer by LiLing Choo — last modified Feb 20, 2013 01:13 AM
A manual compiled by Forest Trend and the Katoomba Group explaining what payments for ecosystem services (PES) are and how PES deals work in the marine environment. The primer is divided into 3 sections, the first reviews basic PES concepts, the second section details a step-by-step approach to developing Marine PES Deals and the third section outlines opportunities, risks and ideal conditions for poverty reduction.
File Payments for Ecosystem Services - Legal and Institutional Frameworks (IUCN Environmental Policy and Law Paper No. 78) by LiLing Choo — last modified Feb 20, 2013 01:14 AM
Supplementary material by Thomas Greiber (Ed), IUCN and the Katoomba Group for Forest Trend's Payments for Ecosystem Services Training Modules and Resources. This paper serves as a diagnostic tool to better understand the necessary legal and institutional basis for water-related PES schemes. The paper provides a background of PES, understanding water-related ecosystem services, the importance of legal frameworks for PES, the scope and contect of PES-related legislation, understanding and realizing the importance of property rights for PES, enabling public and private institutions and their roles in PES and the importance of governance for watershed PES. This paper also includes reports from Brazil, Bolivia, Colombia and Peru.
File REDD Opportunities Scoping Exercise (ROSE): A Tool for Prioritizing Sub-national REDD+ Activities - Case Studies from Ghana, Tanzania, and Uganda by LiLing Choo — last modified Jan 10, 2013 12:52 PM
The ROSE was developed by the Katoomba Ecosystem Services Incubator as a tool for classifying and prioritizing potential REDD+ sub-national activities and for assessing critical constraitnts to project development. The ROSE tool was developed and improved during 2009 by conducting case studies in Tanzania, Uganda and Ghana. The tool has two main phases; a 2-3 day expert workshop and an analysis of policy, legal and institutional constraints by a small in-country team following the workshop.This report report by Michael Richards, Rebecca Asare, Sara Namirembe, Jacob Olander and Matt Quinlan explains the ROSE methodology and process, and summarizes the key findings of the case studies.
File State of Biodiversity Markets: Offset and Compensation Programs Worldwide by LiLing Choo — last modified Jan 10, 2013 12:52 PM
This report highlights the spectrum of biodiversity markets aimed at reducing development impacts to biodiversity, a practice referred to as compensatory mitigation. Some countries are in the early stages of implementation or identification of this practice, while others have mature systems. This report describes the background, scope and methods of compensatory mitigation and examples of compensation programs in North America, Central & South America, Europe, Asia, Australia & New Zealand, and the developing programs in Africa.
File Ecosystem Marketplace-State of Watershed Payments by Rose Hessmiller — last modified Jul 30, 2014 08:50 PM
A global research effort conducted by Ecosystem Marketplace identified a total of approximately 288 payments for watershed services (PWS) and water quality trading (WQT) programs in varying stages of activity over the past 30 years. In 2008, the baseline year, about 127 programs were actively receiving payments or transacting credits. The total transaction value from all programs actively engaged in 2008 is estimated at US$9.3 billion. Over the entire time span of recorded activity, total transaction value is estimated at slightly more than US$50 billion, impacting some 3.24 billion hectares. This report has 3 objectives, 1) to use project-level data to estimate the overall size and scope of the payments directed to protest or restore watershed services; 2) to account for the full spectrum of watershed services activities and track changes going forward, and 3) to look ahead at the opportunities and challenges based on the current level of transactions, experimentation, and lessons learned. Featured in News: USAID RM Portal Featured Stories, September 7, 2010.
File Tools for the Tides: Exploring Coastal and Marine Markets by LiLing Choo — last modified Jan 10, 2013 12:52 PM
Ecosystem Marketplace Insight Booklet on Coastal and Marine PES Markets. Many of the articles in this Insight booklet were created for the Marine Katoomba event, which took place in Palo Alto, California in February of 2010. Additional pieces have specifically been contributed for Katoomba XVII in Hanoi, Vietnam, June 23-24 2010.
File Impacts of Payments for Ecosystem Services on Deforestation in Mexico: Preliminary Lessons for REDD by LiLing Choo — last modified Jan 23, 2014 09:29 PM
Tenure Brief, NO. 11: September 2010 - The brief summarizes an evaluation of the environmental effectiveness of Mexico’s national Payments for Hydrological Services program, which compensates rural landowners for avoided deforestation. The evaluation found that in an early year of implementation Mexico’s program had a small to moderate but significant effect in reducing deforestation, indicating that financial compensation policies can be effective in preventing environmental degradation. The research also suggests that some slippage of deforestation may have occurred, implying that avoided deforestation is best accounted for at a regional or national level.
File Soil Carbon and Land Use Change in the Tropics: an Updated Meta-Analysis by LiLing Choo — last modified Jan 10, 2013 12:52 PM
ABSTRACT: Soil carbon stocks are a vital component of ecosystem services, particularly in the tropics. Recent attention has focused effects of land-use change in the tropics on soil carbon stocks to better understand how human activities have influenced the release of carbon from soils. We conducted an updated meta-analysis of data from 144 studies that measured soil carbon under different land uses across the tropics. Mean soil carbon stocks vary between dry (55 MgC/ha, <1000 mm MAP), moist (67 MgC/ha, 1000-2500 mm MAP), and wet (85 MgC/ha, >2500 mm MAP) climates with wet climates having the highest mean stocks for each land use. Overall, grasslands (604 MgC/ha) and cultivated sites (594 MgC/ha) have statistically significant lower soil carbon stocks than pastures (684 MgC/ha), which do not differ significantly from unconverted forests (803 MgC/ha) and secondary forests (842 MgC/ha). Using a regression tree analysis, we show that soil type and climate are the most influential factors in determining the fate of soil carbon during conversion from one land use to another. Hence, understanding a site’s environment is crucial for predicting the loss or gain of soil carbon. Our soil carbon meta-analysis revealed a number of challenges for comparing soil carbon stocks across studies. These include comparing soil carbon concentrations when differences in bulk density are unknown, variation in sampling depths and replication, and incomplete knowledge of site land use history. Addressing these challenges will enhance our understanding of rates of soil carbon sequestration and factors contributing to the fate of soil carbon.
File Tropical Land Use Change and Soil Carbon: Implications for REDD Policies by LiLing Choo — last modified Jan 10, 2013 12:52 PM
Tenure Brief, No. 12, October 2010 - The release of soil carbon due to changes in land use can be a major source of greenhouse gases. This brief illustrates the distribution and scale of soil carbon in the humid tropics, an area with high concentrations of carbon soil stocks. The brief further analysis the impact that various land use changes have on these stocks, and the implications for climate change.
File Whom to pay? Key Concepts and Terms Regarding Tenure and Property Rights in Payment-based Forest Ecosystem Conservation by LiLing Choo — last modified Jan 10, 2013 12:52 PM
Tenure Brief, No. 15: December 2010 - We define key tenure terms related to forests and highlight concepts likely to be encountered in the design, implementation or evaluation of incentive-based conservation programs—such as payments for ecosystem services (PES) or Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD). Additionally, we discuss policy options that can clarify property rights and strengthen tenure security.
File REDD Readiness in the Southern Highlands of Tanzania by LiLing Choo — last modified Jan 10, 2013 12:52 PM
Overview of WCS's Southern Highlands Conservation Programme and designing a REDD project in the broader context of conservation in the Southern Highlands, Tanzania. Presentation was given as part of the "Innovative Uses of Land Use Planning Tools in WCS’s Landscapes Around the World" lunch time talk series at the WCS Land Cover Modelling for REDD Workshop held October 25– 29, 2010 in Bronx, New York, USA.ronx, New York, USA.
File Report for the Conservation Finance Alliance: National REDD+ funding frameworks and achieving REDD+ readiness – findings from consultation by LiLing Choo — last modified Jan 10, 2013 12:52 PM
2010 report for the Conservation Finance Alliance (CFA) from PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC) on how REDD+ funding is currently, or could in the future, be managed and disbursed to developing countries. The report includes six case study country reports - Brazil, Cambodia, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Indonesia, Madagascar and Peru- resulting from interviews conducted by RwC with stakeholder representatives from government, civil society, academia and the private sector in 2010; and an analysis report on the role of environmental funds and civil society in REDD+, based on interviews carried out in the six countries mentioned above and six additional countries (Costa Rica, Tanzania, Colombia, Ecuador, Mexico and Uganda) in 2009. Report was made possible by USAID through the TransLinks cooperative agreement.
File Asia-Pacific Forestry Sector Outlook Study by Kelly Gibbons — last modified Feb 20, 2013 02:04 AM
The study aims to determine the current status and key issues of the forestry sector, identify driving forces which will impact forest and forestry of Nepal, develop probable scenarios for the future and insight on Nepal's forest and forestry and how it will evolve till 2020.
File Mozambique USFS IP Trip Report: In Support of the 5F Project, Fire Fighting and Community Forestry in Chikweti Forests; Aug 07 by Portal Web Editor — last modified Jan 10, 2013 09:57 AM
USFS Technical Assistance: In Support of the 5F Project, Fire Fighting and Community Forestry in Chikweti Forests, Mozambique
File Global Environmental Change: Does secure land tenure save forests? A meta-analysis of the relationship between land tenure and tropical deforestation by Portal Web Editor — last modified Sep 29, 2013 03:11 PM
Deforestation and degradation are tied to a complex array of socioeconomic and political factors. Many assume that among the most important of these are the particular bundles of rights regulating who can benefit from land (tenure form) and the overall assurance that those rights will be upheld (tenure security). This paper reviews literature that connects forest outcomes and land tenure to better understand broad interactions between tenure form, security and forest change. Papers from economic theory suggest tenure is embedded in a broader socioeconomic context, with the potential for either a positive or negative conservation impact on forested land.
Document Actions
Back to Top