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Ag and Rural Development Smart List

by Jean Brennan last modified Jan 10, 2013 09:06 AM
This smart list searched for the text "agriculture" or "rural development" appears.
File Presentation by Andrew Muir: HIV/AIDS, Conservation Capacity Building, the Game Reserves and the Promise of Youth by Anna Woltman — last modified Jan 10, 2013 10:58 AM
Andrew Muir, executive director of the Wilderness Foundation South Africa, presents the progress of the Umzi Wethu Training Academy for Displaced Youth since its founding four years ago. Umzi Wethu relies on the economic promise of ecotourism to tackle the cycle of poverty and HIV/AIDS head on with skills development and job placement among some of the most vulnerable members of society: youth on the verge of adulthood. Umzi Wethu targets youth that show resilience and ambition – but despair of opportunities to support their households – and transforms them into highly employable young adults. Since the last ABCG presentation, Umzi Wethu has branched out from one hospitality-focused academy in Port Elizabeth in the Eastern Cape into a second, rural, game-ranger focused academy that is soon to expand and offer training for youth to work in sustainable agriculture. The Wilderness Foundation has embarked on a phase of model refinement, partner recruitment, and roll-out to result in replication of Umzi Wethu Academies across Southern Africa and wherever ecotourism, poverty and HIV/AIDS intersect. Also addressed in Andrew’s presentation will be the Wilderness Foundation’s other youth programs that emphasize HIV/AIDS awareness and stigma reduction, and environmental ethics and leadership skills, as well as engaging political and business leaders in conservation. Andrew is Chair of the Eastern Cape Parks Board and founded Indalo, the Eastern Cape private game reserve association. Wilderness Foundation has launched the Green Leaf standard of management, and it is now being deployed among many ecotourism establishments. 2010
File Building Private-sector Partnerships for Conservation (PSPCs): Lessons learned from the Buffer Zone Project in northern Congo by Portal Web Editor — last modified Jan 10, 2013 10:58 AM
There is no single strategy to effectively curb the loss of biodiversity while facilitating sustainable livelihoods in rural areas. But as tropical countries work to develop their economies, national and international industry will have a larger impact on natural lands and resources than ever before. Engagement with the private sector through the development of partnerships for conservation is one of the most important tools. Private-sector partnerships for conservation (PSPCs) are alliances between businesses and conservation organizations, public agencies or local communities to promote mutually beneficial and ecologically and socially responsible activities. One such partnership unites a logging company, international conservation organization, and government for the management of hunting and wildlife in the Republic of Congo. The Buffer Zone Project (BZP) has worked since 1999 to protect the Nouabalé-Ndoki National Park (NNNP) from hunting pressure, to manage wildlife in four logging concessions adjacent to the protected area, and to mitigate the negative effects of logging on biodiversity and the livelihoods of local residents. Guided by five key wildlife management principles, the BZP implemented a multi-pronged approach that combined law enforcement, development of alternative activities, education and awareness-raising, and research and monitoring. This paper draws from the experiences of the BZP to summarize the risks and benefits of building a PSPC, the components of a successful partnership, and several management strategies for conservation. 2009
File Community Partnerships for Sustainable Resource Management (Compass II) Final project report by Rose Hessmiller — last modified Jan 10, 2013 11:43 AM
The purpose of COMPASS II was to enhance household revenue from participation in community-based natural resource management (CBNRM) initiatives that generated income as well as contributed to safeguarding Malawi’s natural resources. This was part of a strategy to mainstream community-based management of natural resources within a transformational development framework that progressed toward eventual graduation from developmental foreign aid, one of the USAID global operational goals for broad-based prosperity in stable, democratic countries such as Malawi. Building on solid foundations established from previous investments by USAID and others of increased capacity among Malawian government and nongovernmental organizations to adopt strategies that ensured long-term economic and environmental sustainability, COMPASS II worked to accomplish three objectives: 1. To increase the decentralization of natural resource management, 2. To enhance rural communities' capacity to sustainably manage their natural resources, and 3. To increase sales of natural resource-based products by rural households.
File Fostering Ecosystem Services in the Danube Basin by Portal Web Editor — last modified Jan 10, 2013 09:50 AM
The One Europe More Nature (OEMN) initiative was created in 2003 to promote integrated river basin management (IRBM) in order to restore floodplains and stimulate sustainable rural development in the region.
File Rural tourism training ROADMAP: Morocco capacity building and rural tourism development program by Portal Web Editor — last modified Jan 10, 2013 11:57 AM
This document assesses training needs of Morocco's Ministry of Tourism in the context of its restructuring and the development of rural tourism. Recommendations are provided for appropriate training programs to address these needs. The statement of work for the training needs assessment is included in the annexes. 2003
File Improving access to financial services in forest communities by Portal Web Editor — last modified Jan 10, 2013 11:53 AM
This report identifies the enterprise credit needs of forest community people’s organizations (POs) in the Philippines and provides recommendations for their development and improved access to rural financial services.
File Clean development mechanism forestry for rural poverty reduction and biodiversity conservation: Making the CDM work for rural communities by Portal Web Editor — last modified Jan 10, 2013 08:32 AM
This booklet provides an overview of the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) and demonstrates its benefits for the rural development community.
File Water for rural development: Background paper on water for rural development prepared for the World Bank by Portal Web Editor — last modified Jan 10, 2013 08:31 AM
This paper is divided into two parts: First, it outlines the most important issues from IWMI's point of view on water for rural development, with a focus on developing countries. Second, it provides an analysis of present and future water resources
File West Africa Water Initiative: Water for the poor by Portal Web Editor — last modified Jan 10, 2013 08:28 AM
Introduction to the West Africa Water Initiative designed to provide rural water and sanitation as an entry point for community development.
The Other Green Revolution: Farmer-led Change in the Sahel 1980-2010 Oct 27-29 Event with Twitter coverage by Portal Web Editor — last modified Jan 10, 2013 07:31 AM
Development solutions are often local, even when rural communities are confronted with environmental and human catastrophes. For donors, the payoffs to investing in local solutions can be great. This series of events will showcase a success story of development assistance that rediscovered and underwrote farmer strategies for combating drought and food insecurity. During the devastating droughts of the 1970s and 1980s, Sahelian farmers had a simple but dramatic choice: fight back or lay down their hoes. Farmers like Yacouba Sawadogo and Sakina Mati decided to fight back, reclaiming land from the encroaching desert. Thirty years later, aerial photography and satellite imagery, ground-truthed by field research, confirms that a farmer-managed, agro-environmental transformation has occurred on a surprising scale in the Sahel. There are more trees, more people, and more water in what was once a landscape made windswept and barren. How did this happen? Meet Mr. Yacouba Sawadogo, Burkina Faso, and Mrs. Sakina Mati, Niger. Beneficiaries: 1.5 million people Increase in land suitable for cultivation: 5.2-5.3 million hectares
File Nature, Wealth and Power (Latin America) by Carmen Tedesco — last modified Jan 10, 2013 11:42 AM
Although highly urbanized the rural areas of Latin America continue to be the home of a large percentage of the poor. In addition rural areas provide a number of essential goods and services for LA economies and quality of life. Many poor people are rural and depend on natural resources for their livelihoods and growth. If the Millennium Development Goals are to be achieved in the region urgent action is needed on rural poverty. The critical linkages between natural resources, growth and poverty alleviation, and governance and democracy are becoming more evident every day. And these linkages and complementarities are providing a powerful framework with which to analyze and attack rural issues.
File Nature, Wealth and Power (Asia) by Carmen Tedesco — last modified Jan 10, 2013 11:42 AM
Asia, particularly South Asia, has the highest number of poor people in the world today. Many of these people are rural and depend on natural resources for their livelihoods and growth. If the United Nation’s Millennium Development Goals are to be achieved in the region urgent action is needed on rural poverty. The critical linkages between natural resources, growth and poverty alleviation, and governance and democracy are becoming more evident every day. And these linkages and complementarities are providing a powerful framework with which to analyze and attack rural issues.
File Mainstreaming National Action Programmes into the Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper Process by Carmen Tedesco — last modified Jan 10, 2013 11:41 AM
Two different but parallel and sometimes overlapping processes have characterized the assessment of poverty and land degradation in arid, semi-arid and sub-humid regions; the National Action Programme (NAP) under the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification (UNCCD) and the poverty reduction strategies that in many countries culminate in the World Bank geared Poverty Reduction Strategies and Strategy Papers (PRSP). These two processes are most effective in dealing with resource and poverty issues, if they are mainstreamed one with the other. The mainstreaming of the NAP into the PRSP will have a welcomed integrating impact on sectoral strategies, will upscale the UNCCD advocated approaches and allow stronger focus on the environment/poverty nexus. The results of mainstreaming can materialize in the sharper development of pro-poor investments in most affected rural areas. These investments will provide environmental sustainability and improvement in economic well being. Some countries have already embarked on this mainstreaming. This paper details the needs, processes and benefits of mainstreaming in addressing poverty and extreme poverty in the affected countries. Recommendations suggest how this integration can be achieved and outline the needed steps for all parties including, the NAP focal points, the PRSP process, the Agencies, the Affected Countries and the Developed Countries, both individually and in the partnerships which need to be developed to deal with poverty reduction in environmentally degraded areas. (INCI)
File Land Degradation Case Studies 08 - Indonesia by Carmen Tedesco — last modified Jan 10, 2013 11:41 AM
This paper is part of a series of case studies, which attempt on a pilot country basis to examine the costs of land degradation (INCI). This stage of the work involves a desk analysis of: • Impacts of land degradation • Costs of land degradation • Costs of land improvement measures • Costs of policy reform and institutional development. In general there is reasonable, though not comprehensive, information on the impacts of land degradation and a good assessment base of the proximate and root causes. Linkages with poverty are well established and current remedial programs can be identified. There is much less information on the impact on the ground of these actions. It is clear that the impact of land degradation is a drain on economic growth in rural areas and has an affect on national economic growth patterns. Investment in remedial action is hard to quantify, but appears an order of magnitude smaller than the scope of the problem. Actual in country joint assessment with national stakeholders will be necessary to provide specific analysis of the countries concerned.
File Land Degradation Case Studies 07 - Chile by Carmen Tedesco — last modified Jan 10, 2013 11:41 AM
This paper is part of a series of case studies, which attempt on a pilot country basis to examine the costs of land degradation (INCI). This stage of the work involves a desk analysis of: • Impacts of land degradation • Costs of land degradation • Costs of land improvement measures • Costs of policy reform and institutional development. In one region of Chile in general there is reasonable, though not comprehensive, information on the impacts of land degradation and a good assessment base of the proximate and root causes. Linkages with poverty are well established. There is much less information on the impact on the ground of these actions. It is clear that the impact of land degradation is a drain on economic growth in rural areas and has an affect on national economic growth patterns. Investment in remedial action is hard to quantify, but appears an order of magnitude smaller than the scope of the problem. Actual in country joint assessment with national stakeholders will be necessary to provide specific analysis of the countries concerned.
File Land Degradation Case Studies 06 - Rwanda by Carmen Tedesco — last modified Jan 10, 2013 11:41 AM
This paper is part of a series of case studies, which attempt on a pilot country basis to examine the costs of land degradation (INCI). This stage of the work involves a desk analysis of: • Impacts of land degradation • Costs of land degradation • Costs of land improvement measures • Costs of policy reform and institutional development. In general there is reasonable, though not comprehensive, information on the impacts of land degradation and a good assessment base of the proximate and root causes. Linkages with poverty are well established and the cost of current remedial programs can be identified. There is much less information on the impact on the ground of these actions. It is clear that the impact of land degradation is a drain on economic growth in rural areas and has an affect on national economic growth patterns. Investment in remedial action is hard to quantify, but appears an order of magnitude smaller than the scope of the problem. Actual in country joint assessment with national stakeholders will be necessary to provide specific analysis of the countries concerned.
File Land Degradation Case Studies 05 - Uganda by Carmen Tedesco — last modified Jan 10, 2013 11:41 AM
This paper is part of a series of case studies, which attempt on a pilot country basis to examine the costs of land degradation (INCI). This stage of the work involves a desk analysis of: • Impacts of land degradation • Costs of land degradation • Costs of land improvement measures • Costs of policy reform and institutional development. In general there is reasonable, though not comprehensive, information on the impacts of land degradation and a good assessment base of the proximate and root causes. Linkages with poverty are well established and the cost of current remedial programs can be identified. There is much less information on the impact on the ground of these actions. It is clear that the impact of land degradation is a drain on economic growth in rural areas and has an affect on national economic growth patterns. Investment in remedial action is hard to quantify, but appears an order of magnitude smaller than the scope of the problem. Actual in country joint assessment with national stakeholders will be necessary to provide specific analysis of the countries concerned.
File Land Degradation Case Studies 04 - Mexico by Carmen Tedesco — last modified Jan 10, 2013 11:41 AM
This paper is part of a series of case studies, which attempt on a pilot country basis to examine the costs of land degradation (INCI). This stage of the work involves a desk analysis of: • Impacts of land degradation • Costs of land degradation • Costs of land improvement measures • Costs of policy reform and institutional development. In general there is reasonable, though not comprehensive, information on the impacts of land degradation and a good assessment base of the proximate and root causes. Linkages with poverty are well established and the cost of current remedial programs can be identified. There is much less information on the impact on the ground of these actions. It is clear that the impact of land degradation is a drain on economic growth in rural areas and has an affect on national economic growth patterns. Investment in remedial action is hard to quantify, but appears an order of magnitude smaller than the scope of the problem. Actual in country joint assessment with national stakeholders will be necessary to provide specific analysis of the countries concerned.
File Land Degradation Case Studies 03 - Ethiopia by Carmen Tedesco — last modified Jan 10, 2013 11:41 AM
This paper is part of a series of case studies, which attempt on a pilot country basis to examine the costs of land degradation (INCI). This stage of the work involves a desk analysis of: • Impacts of land degradation • Costs of land degradation • Costs of land improvement measures • Costs of policy reform and institutional development. In general there is reasonable, though not comprehensive, information on the impacts of land degradation and a good assessment base of the proximate and root causes. Linkages with poverty are well established and current remedial programs can be identified. There is much less information on the impact on the ground of these actions. It is clear that the impact of land degradation is a drain on economic growth in rural areas and has an affect on national economic growth patterns. Investment in remedial action is hard to quantify, but appears an order of magnitude smaller than the scope of the problem. Actual in country joint assessment with national stakeholders will be necessary to provide specific analysis of the countries concerned.
File Land Degradation Case Studies 02 - China by Carmen Tedesco — last modified Jan 10, 2013 11:41 AM
This paper is part of a series of case studies, which attempt on a pilot country basis to examine the costs of land degradation (INCI). This stage of the work involves a desk analysis of: • Impacts of land degradation • Costs of land degradation • Costs of land improvement measures • Costs of policy reform and institutional development. In general there is reasonable, though not comprehensive, information on the impacts of land degradation and a good assessment base of the proximate and root causes. Linkages with poverty are well established and the cost of current remedial programs can be identified. There is much less information on the impact on the ground of these actions. It is clear that the impact of land degradation is a drain on economic growth in rural areas and has an affect on national economic growth patterns. Investment in remedial action is hard to quantify, but appears an order of magnitude smaller than the scope of the problem. Actual in country joint assessment with national stakeholders will be necessary to provide specific analysis of the countries concerned.
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